Tag: Keira Knightley

Keira Knightley and Ralph Fiennes in “The Duchess” – Critical Review

Keira Knightley and Ralph Fiennes in “The Duchess” – Critical Review

Actors Keira Knightley and Ralph Fiennes worked together in the worst movie plot I have ever seen, entitled The Duchess. Though two or three weeks have passed since I watched this movie, I dare not watch it again for a simple review. For The Duchess movie ought to disappear from the record books.



The Disastrous Plotline in The Duchess

The Duchess
Keira Knightley as “Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire”.
Photo by Nick Wall

Never before have I seen a historical woman so skewed in a movie to fit the feminist agenda. Though I have yet to acquire a book on the Duchess of Devonshire, I know just enough from online sources to realize the woman’s greater accomplishments. Other than those of surviving a bad marriage.

Keira Knightley played the young woman who became the Duchess of Devonshire. Carefree and flexible, she left her friends to elevate in social ranking by marrying the Duke, William Cavendish. Right from the beginning, the screenwriter showed Duchess Georgiana as being the poor victim who must produce a male heir for a despicable man.



The Duchess
Duke William Cavendish of Devonshire

How did the Duke show himself despicable? Well, he chose his wife’s traveling companion as his mistress. Expressing her anger at the relationship, Duchess Georgiana verbally spat at the Duke and proclaimed to never make love with him again. Upon which the Duke forced himself upon her, and then went back to Lady Bess Foster. From the rape came Duchess Georgiana’s first and only son.

When the Duchess found a childhood friend who loved her deeply, the Duke forbade any love affair, despite his own with Lady Bess. To remain in contact with her daughters and son with the Duke, she permanently disconnected with her friend, who later became Prime Minister Charles Grey. Lady Bess comforted her, so Duchess Georgiana soon stood down and allowed Lady Bess and the Duke to marry. From her one-time affair with Sir Charles came a daughter, whom the Lady Georgiana visited frequently.



Feminist Activists Seen at Work in The Duchess

The Duchess
Keira Knightley as Georgiana, the Duchess of Devonshire stars in THE DUCHESS, a Paramount Vantage release. Photo by Peter Mountain

Real-life Duchess Georgiana played a large and significant role in fashion and politics. Whereas the Duke seemed moody and disinterested in common affairs, the Duchess would actively participate in the political dinners and gatherings. Hence how she came across her childhood friend, Sir Charles Grey.

Moreover, Duchess Georgiana was anything but a saint. For in her marriage to the Duke of Devonshire, she acquired massive amounts of gambling debt. This also served to prove her relations with the political heads, because gambling served as a frequent pastime among the ladies and gentlemen.

To finetune the plot, and keep the movie from showing as something unpolitical, more emphasis should have been placed on the social times. For during the time in which the Duchess lived, religion had a strong hold on how people behaved. Many things done today didn’t exist in England’s past. Therefore, to expect Duke William Cavendish to behave the same way as modernday husbands is ridiculous.



Recommendations for The Duchess

Movie critics loved this movie. Something which makes sense to me, considering the generally widespread liberal agenda sweeping across Europe and the United States. According to the critics, since this movie criticized men, it was a masterpiece.

As for me, I found the film completely unfair to men and historically ambiguous. The Duchess of Devonshire had power! She was no fainting damsel in distress. Consequently, I cannot in good conscious recommend this film. While the costume designer created beautiful garments, he failed to save the disastrous plotline. So, please, spare yourselves the pain and watch something historically and politically sound.



Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley in The Imitation Game – Critical Review

Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley in The Imitation Game – Critical Review

Produced in 2014, The Imitation Game used several popular British actors and actresses to promote an ever-increasing, popular movement: LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) pride and accomplishment.

Provided below is a short summarization of the film and the message I gathered from the film’s making. Whether my readers agree with my analysis or not will hopefully provide for interesting and polite discussion in the comments below.

The Story Behind The Imitation Game

Imitation Game
Benedict Cumberbatch stars in The Imitation Game as Alan Turning.

Set in the year 1939, Britain’s secret agency was looking to hire several men to help them break Nazi Germany’s Enigma. For those who don’t know, Enigma had to do with Nazi Germany’s coded communication method. The story revolved around one of the hired mathematicians, Alan Turing.

As the movie progressed, the viewers learned about Turing’s logical mind and antisocial behaviors. The producers made his homosexuality evident early in the movie. And downright blatant halfway through the movie in a scene between Turing and his fiance, whom Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley played.

Imitation Game
Keira Knightley in The Imitation Game as Joan Clarke.

Through political means, Turing managed to fire two of his co-workers to provide the funding for the machine he insisted would win the war. It was the first computer ever made. Eventually, after some toil and turmoil, the hired team and the machine decoded Nazi Germany’s Enigma.

As mentioned above, the producers emphasized on Turing’s homosexuality. They detailed a boyhood’s lost love, how the lost love affected his adult life, and the trials Turing underwent when convicted of indecent behavior. Ultimately, the movie portrayed Turing as a war hero and a victim before he committed suicide at 41 years of age.

The Politics Behind The Imitation Game

Imitation Game
The scene where Alan Turing and his team solve the Enigma.

The film’s aesthetics, such as the sound score, were beyond lovely. However, the social and political messaging behind The Imitation Game were nauseating. Though I have heard of it done, never before had I seen a story so flagrantly flounce the simple contributions of a homosexual man.

Throughout the movie, I had been caught up in the story. I rooted for Turing in his job, related to him in his social awkwardness, and sympathised with him for his lost love. However, when the movie ended, I saw the politics. I saw how exaggerated everything was to make Turing look like a victimized hero, all due to his homosexuality.

Thankfully, I had watched this movie on Netflix instead of buying it. For while Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley may rank high on my favorites list, I dislike promoting political agendas. Everyone should have the option to believe in what they will.

My Recommendation on Watching The Imitation Game

If someone reading this blog post belongs to the LGBT community, then he or she will love this movie and should watch it. And anyone who accepts the LGBT community with open arms will also enjoy this movie. However, those who believe the Holy Bible as I do, should find something else to watch. This movie is all about gay pride.

Please, before someone slams me as being a homophobe, recognize that I accept any LGBT member as a friend. However, my beliefs prevent me from accepting their lifestyle. Therefore, I avoid, and advice others with similar beliefs, to avoid political agenda movies, such as The Imitation Game.

Thank you for reading. Please comment below on how stupid I am, or how I may have a point, or the excellent scenery and score in the movie, or more.