Some Evil Drives Every Will, from Murderous Orc to Sinful Man

some evil

J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis assuredly sat and thought together based on the similarities in their written works. And, in this case, Director, Screenwriter, and Producer Peter Jackson must have also thought along the same lines when scripting J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Two Towers.  Half the thought was about some evil fighting against the good in all their written works. And we must find the reason why.

How Aragorn Recognized “Some Evil” in the Creatures Which He Hunted




Peter Jackson’s second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Two Towers, started with Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee. The creature following them since The Fellowship of the Ring, named Gollum, trailed close on their heels at this point. Causing Frodo and Sam to confront the evil and deformed creature head-on.

After this encounter with an evil-based character, the film panned over to the Uruk-hai. These debased, human-sized orcs tortured Merry and Pippin, showing their moral lacking and cruel thought patterns. When they sensed Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli on their trail, they sped up, determined to steal away the hobbits.



The three hunters filled the screen, Aragorn II, son of Arathorn, leading the way. He bent down, listened to the land’s reverberations, and updated the others on the Uruk-hai. Dejected at learning how the Uruk-hai had picked up their scent, Aragorn remarked on something ominous. Something dark, dangerous, and all-too-true:

There’s something strange at work here. Some evil gives speed to these creatures. Sets its will against us.

~ Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn II, son of Arathorn,
in Peter Jackson’s The Two Towers

How “Some Evil” Based J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings in Reality




Remember the boss who gave your raise and promotion to someone else, after you toiled so hard without complaint? Or, how about the sibling-in-laws who refuse to acknowledge you as family? And those un-Christlike church members, how they judge your faith and refuse to treat you like a loving brother or sister-in-Christ? “Some evil” inspired them all.

Evil, which manifests itself in countless forms, serves as the antithesis to God and his goodness. Writers write stories about good and evil because good and evil have such a strong presence in, what people most commonly refer to as, “the real world.” For the real world consists of much more than what we can see or hear. Forces unknown and unseen rule the real world, and we should be afraid.

What J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, and Peter Jackson Know About “Some Evil” Influence




I don’t intend to start a debate on whether people are inherently good or bad. For I realize some people want to think people are good, some people think people are bad, and yet other people think people are either good or bad.

Personally, I believe when Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit, they introduced a spiritual strand in people that corrupts us and makes us bad. But none of this changes the undeniable evil, existent in the universe.



C.S. Lewis wrote many novels about the existent evil within the known universe. One such novel is The Screwtape Letters, in which Lewis took time to describe how the evil forces, known as demons, influence fallible and easily misled humans. A human-based reality also depicted in J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy world.

Aragorn knew “some evil” led the Uruk-hai, for the orcs exhibited little intelligence or teamwork when left to their own devices. And “some evil” meant Saruman, Sauron’s ally.



“Wait a minute. Saruman was an actual character in the books and movies, not some spiritual force,” one might say. “There is no relation to C.S. Lewis’s demons.”

Wrong! Though I might have hesitated to say J.R.R. Tolkien refrained from any Christian symbolism in his work before, I’ve changed my mind now. Several scenes and script lines in The Two Towers forced me to rethink my stance.

For, as I’ve heard, the wizards in Middle-earth represented more than simple magic. According to God-fearing Tolkien fans, the wizards represented God’s angels. Making Saruman a fallen angel, a forbidding demon in control.

How “Some Evil” Translates Into the Christian Life in the Real World




So, if C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien agreed on evil forces affecting life-and-blood creatures, whether human or orc, then there must exist an omniscient good power. This good power is God, known as the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Anyone who knows just a little bit about these two men know about their great faith. If you don’t know, please just check up on that. It’s an eyeopener to see the expanse of their belief.



The people groups who worked as teams in The Two Towers represent the persecuted Christians in the real world. We lazy, laid-back Christians in today’s America don’t hardly compare to the persecuted Christians in the World Wars and every war following.

But, like the Christian people in past wars, the Fellowship in The Lord of the Rings stood and fought together. They pursued the right path, no matter how hard. They stuck to their beliefs.



Therefore, if you believe in God, and you can recognize evil actions and thoughts, then I encourage you to fight. To battle against the evil that attacks from every imaginable force. Nothing greater exists than to do God’s will.

J.R.R. Tolkien recognized this, as did C.S. Lewis, and as Peter Jackson portrayed it in The Lord of the Rings. And if you’re looking at what good there is to fight for, then start with looking at what the Fellowship fought for in The Lord of the Rings.



Regarding the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings – Critical Review

Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

Reading the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings revealed much about the author. First and foremost, the text portrayed the outstandingly extensive breadth in all relations regarding J.R.R. Tolkien’s thought, study, and imagination. It also portrayed some of his likings and enjoyments in life.

“Concerning Hobbits” Section One in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings




J.R.R. Tolkien’s Prologue contains a long, detailed script regarding all things in relation to Hobbits. Much detail was given on subgroups among the Hobbits, what they look like, where they dwell, how they work the land, who remains prominent among them, how they relate to other Middle-Earth folk, and more. There seemed no end to the history, allegory, or factual tidbits.

Words failed me when I tried to describe to my father the imaginative depth and shocking detail included in this first section, “Concerning Hobbits.”  However, my father, who has read The Lord of the Rings several times throughout his life, knew the perfect phrase: Obsessive detail.



Obsessive is exactly what I would call J.R.R. Tolkien’s work. Do some Tolkien fans take offense at this terminology? I hope not, for I mean no offense at this term. In fact, I have the proclivity and bias to believe deep people, obsessive and philosophical (and many times theological), lean toward genius in their arts and crafts.

The writing in this section layered detail upon detail, upon detail, and so on. J.R.R. Tolkien set the foundation for an imaginative people, then provided them with an imaginative history, then educated them with a language grounded in linguistic theory, and then added imaginative folklore for the imaginative Hobbits. In other words, Hobbits and the Shire could be real folk, in a real land, in a real world. Where could have J.R.R. Tolkien received his genius?

“Concerning Pipe-weed” Section Two in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings




“Concerning Pipe-weed” in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings provided the perfect laughing magic after much education regarding Hobbits. For within the very first paragraph to this second section, Tolkien wrote a word very similar to an English word called nicotine. This “Nicotiana” was what Hobbits stuffed into their pipes, clay or wooden, and smoked.

J.R.R. Tolkien proceeded to provide imaginative detail regarding where the weed first came from. Did it come from the Hobbit village named Bree? Or does the weed grow native in the man-ruled city called Gondor? Again, Tolkien proved his imagination’s depth in creating Middle-Earth history similar to our world’s history, which means every culture is flummoxed about actual historical deeds and actions.

What this section blatantly shows is the time in which J.R.R. Tolkien lived. Cigarettes and cigars dominated most Englishmen pastimes, especially during World War II (WWII). With this in mind, and the knowledge about how this nicotine helped our WWII men to relax and rest, I can see why Tolkien included the Nicotiana weed into his literature. For every creature needs some means to rest, bodily and mentally.

“Of the Ordering of the Shire” Section Three in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings




“Of the Ordering of the Shire” in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings detailed the government type that every conservative wishes for: minimal to nonexistent government. Based on how Tolkien described the governing society within the Shire, it resembled the United States government very much. The main similarity being free will, the other democracy.

Where the U.S. law enforcement writes speeding tickets and handles domestic disputes, the Shire’s law enforcement deals more with folk outside the gated borders. Hobbits called them the “Bounders,” strange folk on suspicious business. Such Bounders had appeared in Hobbit towns before. But those days were long ago, and the Hobbits had forgotten the danger these strange faces carried with them. Could this compare to the danger which German strangers presented to the English children in the early 1900’s?

“Of the Finding of the Ring” Section Four in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings




Here Bilbo Baggins took stage. His story, summarized in “Of the Finding of the Ring” in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, revealed the dark story concerning a black heart and its “precious.”

Gollum would strike fear in anyone’s heart, let alone a simple, earth-loving Hobbit. For a ring to have so much power in prolonging a creature’s life, corrupting the creature to solely desire its power, made known the evil behind it. And to have the honest and adventurous Bilbo Baggins lie about how he found the one ring only made certain its terrible power.

This fourth section seemed put-in merely to set the stage for The Lord of the Rings. It informed the reader as to why poor Frodo Baggins had to carry his heavy burden, and consequently why all the connecting events occurred. J.R.R. Tolkien wrote to draw people into Middle-Earth. As did his son, Christopher Tolkien, when he wrote on the history surrounding Middle-Earth. But that’s a different matter entirely.

“NOTE ON THE SHIRE RECORDS” Final Section in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings




Not much need be said on the final section in the Prologue for J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. The author again showed his obsessive brilliance on imaginative history and folklore, connecting his work to how his readers would perceive it, as written accounts from Middle-Earth Men and Hobbits. To this fictional world there seems no end, and nor do we want there to be.

I hope anyone who reads this post will join me as we continue to read and review J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings! Continuing on with the series, we will compare and contrast how the story’s events relate to his personal life.

After all, Tolkien had mentioned this as a possible occurrence in his Foreword. Two biographies, one concerning the Inklings, the other concerning Tolkien himself, now exist on my bookshelf for this purpose. Let the fight between good and evil begin!



“So do all who live to see such times, but that is not for them to decide.” (The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001)

live to see such times

Peter Jackson’s The Fellowship of the Ring expounds Gandalf’s most significant message in the entire trilogy. Earlier in the film, Frodo had expressed his desire for all the evil to have never happened. So when Frodo stopped to consider his long and lonely journey ahead, Gandalf’s words came back to him: “So do all who live to see such times, but that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”

We Who Live to See Such Times in the Modern World




Throughout this whole past year, left-leaning voters have whined heavily about USA’s current President Donald Trump for being USA’s current president. They live to see such times demolished and destroyed, never to happen again. They refuse to play fair with the right-leaning thinkers who also live in the country.

But politics are of little concern here in Mary Loves the UK. What concerns us more are the nuclear weapons. Why do people in other countries hate and fight fellow people in neighboring countries? Why do people have an intolerance for anything different?

J.R.R. Tolkien’s hobbits would never understand why men fight for power as they do. They live happy lives, growing what they will, taking on only simple troubles. And as elderly men live to see such times, they too begin to wonder why. Or else, they fall completely prey to the fight for power.

Deciding Our Course When We Live to See Such Times




People with strong faith in something greater than themselves normally have better perspective on what to do with their lives. Raised within the church and having read through the Bible, I know several proverbs that speak of men deciding where they shall go, praying and giving thanks for success, and the Lord leading them through it.

Too many people get caught up in the decision on what to do with their lives. Bad economies, terrorist incidents, natural disasters, oncoming wars, and much more can easily lead anyone to wish for better times. They also lead people to make excuses for not using their own, personal time wisely.

To use our best abilities for the best causes, we must first discover our abilities and learn about the most important causes. Faith in God should lead us to the Bible, which speaks greatly on the many ways to worship the Creator and to help each other. Local communities join together to help the poor, the widows, and the orphans. A good paying job could serve a greater purpose. The choice belongs to us.

To Live to See Such Times in Tolkien’s View




J.R.R. Tolkien’s childhood was spent in England, specifically when Germany bombed London to smithereens. Hopefully some biographies on Tolkien will shed some light on whether or not J.R.R. Tolkien took the northern trains during his childhood. For regardless of his situation, it was for certain that the Tolkien family desired to see better times.

Maybe The Lord of the Rings came from this young boy’s faith in something greater. Maybe it came from his traumatic and misplaced childhood during World War I. Whatever the inspiration, J.R.R. Tolkien assuredly inspired many to see what they can do when given difficult times in which to live.



What Teachers Say About The Lord of the Rings vs. What J.R.R. Tolkien Said

What Teachers Say About The Lord of the Rings

Who here had the great fortune to read J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings as required reading in high school? I did! But I read the novels and some connected works several more times afterwards. And I realized what teachers say about The Lord of the Rings contradicts what J.R.R. Tolkien said about his masterpieces.

What Teachers Say About The Lord of the Rings – The Sorrowful Summary




Teachers have probably edited many great, adequate, and poor student summarizations to this 20th century masterpiece. And I cringe to hear the watered-down significance to this work, concerning both the plotline and the linguistics. However, the hastily-written summaries also help to explain the misapplied meaning behind the novels.

A summary from an uninterested literary student may read as follows: The Lord of the Rings is the fight between good and evil. Hobbits, elves, dwarves are on the good side. Orcs, wizards, and men are on the bad side. Some wizards and men can be good. There’s a ring that could destroy the world, so a group fights to destroy the ring. After a lot of fighting and traveling, the good guys win.

Terrible, miserable, and unacceptable! Anyone who writes such a summarization of J.R.R. Tolkien’s painstakingly detailed fantasy-world should fail the class. Yet, please consider, with this example now placed in mind, the wholly inaccurate meaning behind what teachers say about The Lord of the Rings.

What Teachers Say About The Lord of the Rings – The Made-Up Meaning




The Lord of the Rings symbolizes World War II.”

No! Wrong! Have you read his second edition’s Forward?! J.R.R. Tolkien specifically stated within his 1966 Forward to The Lord of the Rings that his work symbolized something wholly other than World War II (WWII). Don’t believe me? Let me show you:

As for any inner meaning or ‘message’, it has in the intention of the author none. It is neither allegorical nor topical. As the story grew it put down roots (into the past) and threw out unexpected branches: but its main theme was settled from the outset by the inevitable choice of the Ring as the link between it and The Hobbit. The crucial chapter, ‘The Shadow of the Past’, is one of the oldest parts of the tale. It was written long before the foreshadow of 1939 had yet become a threat of inevitable disaster, and from that point the story would have developed along essentially the same lines, if that disaster had been averted. Its sources are things long before in mind, or in some cases already written, and little or nothing in it was modified by the war that began in 1939 or its sequels.

~ J.R.R. Tolkien

For those who grew up thinking J.R.R. Tolkien intended to symbolize WWII with his Middle Earth, please read the above carefully. This awe-inspiring author simply wrote for his own enjoyment. With the possible exception being….

What Teachers Say About The Lord of the Rings –  The Untold Meaning




Far be it from me to say J.R.R. Tolkien wrote to symbolize God, the Devil, and Everything Inbetween. For this, I myself, at this point in time, struggle to see within the novels. However, based on an additional chapter within the second edition’s Forward, I can see where people draw this conclusion.

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote about how he had begun forming Middle Earth, and all its rich history, during his childhood. His childhood was war-stricken (from World War I) and desolate (from the London bombings). With so much destruction around him, it’s remarkable to see how this childhood genius made it into something wonderful.

With J.R.R. Tolkien’s text note in mind, I will continue to read The Lord of the Rings and lookout for similarities between his childhood beliefs and his adulthood beliefs compared to the text. Please join me on this journey. And, hopefully, we’ll reach the end before Amazon’s Middle Earth comes to our screens.



Amazon Bought the Global Television Rights to The Lord of the Rings – Why This Presents an Ethical Dilemma

global television rights to The Lord of the Rings

Cue the funeral dirge. For a company, which entertains complete disregard for the Christian faith, has acquired certain rights to Tolkien’s work. That’s right: Amazon bought the global television rights to The Lord of the Rings.

Why Amazon Bought the Global Television Rights to The Lord of the Rings




We Christians cannot fully blame Jeff Bezos for acquiring the global television rights to J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth. For the Tolkien Estate and the Tolkien Trust had presented these rights to him, as well as to other companies with wholly different views than J.R.R. Tolkien. Jeff Bezos merely presented the most attractive monetary agreement.

Why Amazon bought the global television rights to The Lord of the Rings requires little speculation: Jeff Bezos wanted more money. Whatever he paid for the right to televise The Lord of the Rings (LOTR) must have appeared as small change compared to the calculations for how much a LOTR miniseries would gain in profit. Jeff Bezos simply saw a great opportunity handed to him.

Amazon Bought the Global Television Rights to The Lord of the Rings and What It Said About the Tolkien Estate and Trust




Declaring Jeff Bezos as the only greedy investor in this deal denies the greed working behind the Tolkien Society. Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy was wildly successful, and the Tolkien Society decided they wished for more such financial successes. A simple conclusion based on the common transactions and deals performed among organizations around the world.

Since Amazon bought the global television rights to The Lord of the Rings, Christians need to pray for God’s help. Because if the Christian messages in the LOTR trilogy are to remain intact, God must perform a miracle. For it seems the Tolkien Society chairmen care little about the faith elements which J.R.R. Tolkien incorporated into his work.

Ethical Dilemmas Behind the Deals When Amazon Bought the Global Television Rights to The Lord of the Rings




Why do I conclude the Tolkien Society cares little about J.R.R. Tolkien’s faith? I came to this conclusion because, based on international news found on the Internet and in the Wall Street Journal, Jeff Bezos supports causes that oppose Christian beliefs. To me, selling global television rights to The Lord of the Rings to a man who disregards God, the Son, and the Holy Spirit seems like folly.

To maintain the integrity behind The Lord of the Rings, and remain faithful to the remarkable Christian author, we must hope Jeff Bezos instructs his crew to stay true to the books. Making Tolkien’s beloved characters perform in ways defiant to what is right and true would skew the beauty in J.R.R. Tolkien’s messages. As would also be true if the evil characters performed kind acts.

Amazon Bought the Global Television Rights to The Lord of the Rings and We’re Going to Watch It




As a general rule, my family never buys from Amazon, unless someone presents us with a gift card. However, even spending someone else’s money given to Amazon feels wrong and dirty. Why? Amazon supports causes, such as gay marriage, that the Holy Bible informs Christians to recognize as an abomination. Therefore, we, as Christians, generally refuse to support liberal organizations when they adamantly hate us for our beliefs.

In this particular case, I will make an exception. Since this blog focuses predominantly on British food and British flicks, I will find someone who has an Amazon Prime TV and watch the LOTR miniseries with them. Then, hopefully, I will be able to report to my readers how Amazon remained true to the stories. Though, I highly doubt such will happen.

Who is excited for Amazon acquiring the global television rights to The Lord of the Rings? Do you think Amazon will do well and skew the story only slightly? Or do you think Amazon will use this opportunity to demean J.R.R. Tolkien’s work?